Print Preview

Data Elements and Fillings Requirements


What is the Security Filing?
The Security Filing, commonly known as the “10+2” initiative, is a Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulation that requires importers and vessel operating carriers to provide additional advance trade data to CBP pursuant to Section 203 of the SAFE Port Act of 2006 and section 343(a) of the Trade Act of 2002, as amended by the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002, for non-bulk cargo shipments arriving into the United States by vessel.

U.S. Bound Cargo (Includes FTZ and IT)
Requires the electronic filing of an Importer Security Filing (ISF) comprised of 10 data elements.

Transit Cargo (FROB, IE and TE)
Requires the electronic filing of an Importer Security Filing (ISF) comprised of 5 data elements


The 10 Elements US Bound Cargo (for Shipments Other Than FROB, IE Shipments, and T&E Shipments):
(1) Manufacturer (or supplier) name and address.
Name and address of the entity that last manufactures, assembles, produces, or grows the commodity or name and address of the supplier of the finished goods in the country from which the goods are leaving. In the alternative, the name and address of the manufacturer (or supplier) that is currently required by the import laws, rules and regulations of the United States (i.e., entry procedures) may be provided (this is the information that is used to create the existing manufacturer identification (MID) number for entry purposes).
(2) Seller name and address.
Name and address of the last known entity by whom the goods are sold or agreed to be sold. If the goods are to be imported otherwise than in pursuance of a purchase, the name and address of the owner of the goods must be provided.
(3) Buyer name and address.
Name and address of the last known entity to whom the goods are sold or agreed to be sold. If the goods are to be imported otherwise than in pursuance of a purchase, the name and address of the owner of the goods must be provided.
(4) Ship to name and address.
Name and address of the first deliver-to party scheduled to physically receive the goods after the goods have been released from customs custody.
(5) Container stuffing location.
Name and address(es) of the physical location(s) where the goods were stuffed into the container. For break bulk shipments, the name and address(es) of the physical location(s) where the goods were made ‘‘ship ready’’ must be provided.
(6) Consolidator (stuffer) name and address.
Name and address of the party who stuffed the container or arranged for the stuffing of the container. For break bulk shipments, the name and address of the party who made the goods ‘‘ship ready’’ or the party who arranged for the goods to be made ‘‘ship ready’’ must be provided.
(7) Importer of record number/FTZ applicant identification number.
Internal Revenue Service (IRS) number, Employer Identification Number (EIN), Social Security Number (SSN), or CBP assigned number of the entity liable for payment of all duties and responsible for meeting all statutory and regulatory requirements incurred as a result of importation. For goods intended to be delivered to an FTZ, the IRS number, EIN, SSN, or CBP assigned number of the party filing the FTZ documentation with CBP must be provided. The importer of record number for Importer Security Filing purposes is the same as ‘‘importer number’’ on CBP Form 3461.
(8) Consignee number(s).
Internal Revenue Service (IRS) number, Employer Identification Number (EIN), Social Security Number (SSN), or CBP assigned number of the individual(s) or firm(s) in the United States on whose account the merchandise is shipped. This element is the same as the ‘‘consignee number’’ on CBP Form 3461.
(9) Country of origin.
Country of manufacture, production, or growth of the article, based upon the import laws, rules and regulations of the United States. This element is the same as the ‘‘country of origin’’ on CBP Form 3461.
(10) Commodity HTSUS number.
Duty/statistical reporting number under which the article is classified in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS). The HTSUS number is required to be provided to the six-digit level. The HTSUS number may be provided up to the 10-digit level.This element is the same as the ‘‘H.S. number’’ on CBP Form 3461 and can only be used for entry purposes, if it is provided at the 10-digit level or greater.


Transit Cargo (for shipments FROB, IE Shipments, and T&E Shipments)
Under the proposed regulations, for the Importer Security Filing for shipments consisting entirely of FROB and shipments consisting entirely of goods intended to be ‘‘transported’’ inbond as an IE or T&E, five elements were to be provided in order to enhance the security of the maritime environment.

5 Data Elements are:
(1) Booking party name and address. Name and address of the party who is paying for the transportation of the goods.
(2) Foreign port of unlading. Port code for the foreign port of unlading at the intended final destination.
(3) Place of delivery. City code for the place of delivery.
(4) Ship to name and address. Name and address of the first deliver-to party scheduled to physically receive the goods after the goods have been released from customs custody.
(5) Commodity HTSUS number. Duty/statistical reporting number under which the article is classified in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS). The HTSUS number must be provided to the six digits level. The HTSUS number may be provided up to the 10-digit level.


Powers of Attorney

  • If an agent is used for ISF purposes, a power of attorney (POA) is required.
  • POAs are executed between and maintained by private parties, not by CBP.
  • POAs must be done in English.
  • There is no particular form that needs to be followed. However, 19 CFR 141.32 contains an example of an acceptable general power of attorney.
  • POAs must be retained until revoked.
  • Revoked powers of attorney and letters of revocation must be retained for five years after the date of the revocation


The party required to submit the Importer Security Filing (ISF)
Is the party causing the goods to enter the limits of a port in the United States. This party is known as the “ISF Importer”. It could be the owner, purchaser, consignee, or agent (e.g. customs broker). For foreign cargo remaining on board (FROB), this party is the carrier (vessel operating carrier). The party filing the immediate exportation (IE), transportation and exportation (T&E), or foreign trade zone (FTZ) documentation is the ISF Importer for those types of shipments. The ISF Importer is ultimately responsible for the timely, accurate and complete submission of the ISF filing.


ISF Bonding Requirements

  • ISF filings must be secured by a bond. Generally, continuous bonds will be accepted for ISF filings.
  • The ISF Importer must possess a bond or designate an agent to file under the agent’s bond prior to filing of an ISF.
  • An agent can file under the agent’s bond OR under the ISF Importers bond.
  • The following types of bonds have been amended to cover the new ISF requirements:
    • Basic Importation and Entry Bond § 113.62
    • Basic Custodial Bond § 113.63
    • International Carrier Bond § 113.64
    • Foreign Trade Zone Operator Bond § 113.73
  • CBP also created a new type of bond, the “Importer Security Filing Bond” which can be found in Appendix D to part 113.
  • The ISF Importer is bound to provide a complete, accurate and timely filing or risk liquidated damages in the amount of $5,000.

Print Preview
Go to Top